Community & Eco


Queensland has many organisations whose focus is to improve the health and sustainability of our ocean and the life it sustains.  The following are doing great things in their field and have the support and endorsement of Dive Queensland.

Cairns Turtle Rehabilitation Centre

Cairns Turtle Rehabilitation Centre (CTRC) is a non-profit organisation dedicated to the rehabilitation of sick and injured turtles.  The Great Barrier Reef is home to six of the world’s seven species of marine turtles. A number of these are seriously threatened by a diverse range of natural and, more significantly, human-induced factors. Our rehabilitation facilities are located in Cairns – Far North Queensland, which is where many of the sick and injured turtles that we care for are found.

CTRC supports the work of all organisations, individuals and agencies in their efforts to conserve sea turtles. We work closely with a number of these groups, which includes the environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and EPA National Park Rangers who are responsible for bringing the turtles to us.  CTRC relies on generous donations from supporters and volunteers, without whom we would be unable to continue this important work. Here at CTRC are always looking for new ways to work with other parties, so that our combined efforts are not only focused but maximised for the overall benefit of sea turtle conservation.

 

Great Barrier Reef Legacy

Great Barrier Reef Legacy is a not-for-profit that aims to improve the long-term survival of the Great Barrier Reef. We will do this by providing unprecedented access and support for scientists, innovators, students, and the media on our independent research vessel.  Through public, private and corporate funding we aim to operate the Great Barrier Reef’s only independent research vessel and provide essential access and support for coral reef research, innovation, education and multimedia programs.

 

Reef Restoration Foundation

Reef Restoration Foundation is a non-profit social enterprise that is establishing a series of offshore coral nurseries throughout the Great Barrier Reef to accelerate the recovery of damaged exceptionally high-value coral reefs and strengthen resilience to future bleaching events.   Why? There has been extensive negative media with regard to the health of the Great Barrier Reef and we want to create hope and optimism through undertaking positive tangible action.

Supporting our natural wonder for future generations to enjoy.  Building and maintaining offshore coral nurseries, whilst educating and empowering traditional landowners, locals, volunteers and marine biologists to find and promote corals less vulnerable to El Nino weather patterns.  Coral gardeners creating a better future for the Great Barrier Reef.

Project Aware

Project AWARE® is a global movement for ocean protection powered by a community of adventurers. We connect the passion for ocean adventure with the purpose of marine conservation. Ready to take action for ocean protection? Learn more about how to get involved and make a difference in your local community, fins on and off. Positive change for the ocean starts with you! Go to our website and follow the prompts to ‘My Ocean’ to create your profile and connect with other like-minded agents of positive change around the world.

 

Reef Today

Reef Today is a group to raise awareness of how amazing the Great Barrier Reef still is. Through sharing experiences, photos, videos we can discover new places to explore and encourage others to visit the region.

 

Minke Whale Project

The Minke Whale Project (based at James Cook University, North Queensland Australia) conducts multi-disciplinary research into dwarf minke whale biology and behaviour, the social and economic values of the whales and the sustainable management of swim-with-whales tourism. The MWP research team works collaboratively with the GBR swim-with-minke whales tourism industry, Reef managers and wildlife conservation NGOs.  Dwarf minke whales visit the northern Great Barrier Reef each austral winter, forming the only known predictable aggregation of these whales in the world. Growing up to eight metres and weighing several tonnes, they are exceptionally inquisitive and often approach boats, divers and snorkelers closely, sometimes interacting for extended periods.